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Steep Tea

Jee Leong Koh

Steep Tea
RRP: GBP 9.99
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This title is available for academic inspection (paperback only).
Paperback
ISBN: 978 1 847772 27 5
Categories: 21st Century, American, Black and Asian, Gay and Lesbian
Imprint: Carcanet Poetry
Published: July 2015
216 x 135 x 5 mm
72 pages
Publisher: Carcanet Press
Also available in: eBook (EPUB), eBook (Kindle), eBook (PDF)
Digital access available through Exact Editions
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  • Description
  • Author
  • Awards
  • Reviews
  • Singapore-born poet Jee Leong Koh’s first book to be published in Great Britain is rich in detail of the worlds he explores and invents as he follows his desire for an unknown other, moving tentatively, passionately, always uncertain of himself. His language is colloquial, musical, aware of the infusion of various traditions and histories. ‘You go where? / I’m going from the latterly to the litany, from writs to rites.’ The poems share many of the harsh and enriching circumstances that shape the imagination of a postcolonial queer writer. Taking leaves from other poets -- Emilia Lanyer, Eavan Boland, Xunka’ Utz’utz’ Ni’, Lee Tzu Pheng -- Koh creates a text that is distinctively his own.


    Jee Leong Koh is the author of three books of poems, the most recent being Seven Studies for a Self Portrait (Bench Press). Born and raised in Singapore, he read English at Oxford University and studied Creative Writing at Sarah Lawrence College. He now lives in New York City. ... read more
    Awards won by Jee Leong Koh Runner-up, 2016 Lambda Literary Awards finalist  (Steep Tea)
    'The Singapore-born poet's first UK publication is disciplined yet adventurous in form, casual in tone and deeply personal in subject matter. Koh's verse addresses the split inheritance of his postcolonial upbringing , as well as the tension between an émigré's longing for home and rejection of nostalgia'
    The Financial Times 28.11.2015 
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