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Deformations

Sasha Dugdale

Cover of Deformations by Sasha Dugdale
RRP: GBP 11.99
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This title is available for academic inspection (paperback only).
Paperback
ISBN: 978 1 784108 98 4
Categories: 21st Century, British, Women
Imprint: Carcanet Poetry
Published: July 2020
216 x 135 x 9 mm
104 pages
Publisher: Carcanet Press
Also available in: eBook (Kindle), eBook (EPUB), eBook (PDF)
  • Description
  • Author
  • Awards
  • Reviews
  • Deformations includes two large-scale works related in their preoccupation with biographical and mythical narrative. 'Welfare Handbook' explores the life and art of Eric Gill, the well-known English letter cutter, sculptor and cultural figure, who is known to have sexually abused his daughters. The poem draws on material from Gill's letters, diaries, notes and essays as part of a lyrical exploration of the conjunction between aesthetics, subjectivity and violence. 'Pitysad' is a series of simultaneously occurring fragments composed around themes and characters from Homer's Odyssey. It considers how trauma is disguised and deformed through myth and art. Acting as a bridge between these two works is a series of individual poems on the creation and destruction of cultural and mythical conventions.
    Sasha Dugdale is a poet, translator and playwright. She has published four collections of poetry with Carcanet, Notebook, The Estate, and Red House . In 2017 she was awarded a Cholmondeley Prize. Between 2012 and 2017 she was editor of Modern Poetry in Translation . She is co-director of ... read more
    Awards won by Sasha Dugdale Winner, 2017 The Poetry Book Society Winter Choice Award (Joy) Winner, 2017 SOA Cholmondeley Award Winner, 2016 Forward Prize for Best Single Poem (for 'Joy') Winner, 2003 Eric Gregory Award
    Praise for Sasha Dugdale 'Dugdale proves herself a powerful voice by writing about visual art, poetry, and history "in reverse".

    Antony Huen, The Compass

     'Joy... is a free-wheeling and beautifully sustained portrait of grief and the truths it can convey.'
    Sarah Westcott, Artemis Poetry
    'Dugdale's skill at form is directed at containing the uncontainable death and absence which allows us to handle them, like examining insects trapped in amber'

    Lisa Kelly, Magma Poetry Review 71

    'These compelling stories of strange happenings in an almost imperceptibly strange style make your mind understand foreignness as our process. Sasha Dugdale is a wise bard and her book is a civilising read.'
    Claire Crowther in The Poetry Review
     'The categories of age, empire and (particularly) gender are shown to set unjust limits on human flourishing, and on what histories can be told. Yet Dugdale emphasises that, when oppressed subjects are allowed to express themselves, their stories might still be of willed sacrifice and genuine happiness.'
    Poetry London
       'Sometimes you read a work that is so clearly deserving of the accolades it's received that it restores your faith in things. Sasha Dugdale's 'Joy' is such a work.'
    The Poetry School
    '...a beguiling and unusual debut, its best poems at once elusive, satisfying and likely to go on being read.'
    Sean O'Brien, Times Literary Supplement
     My favourite collection this year is Sasha Digdale's 'Red House' (Carcanet Oxford Poets). I like how she has infused her British sensibility with the passion and abandon of Russian poets like Anna Akhmatova and Marina Tssvetaeva, whom she has previously translated.
    Kathryn Maris, Timeout Magazine Best of 2011
    'The sensibility The Estate reveals is intelligent and wry - as well as highly original'
    Fiona Sampson, Tower Poetry
    'Notebook is a beguiling and unusual debut, its best poems at once elusive, satisfying and likely to go on being read.'
    Times Literary Supplement
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