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American Mules

Martina Evans

Cover of American Mules by Martina Evans
10% off all versions
Categories: 21st Century, Irish, Women
Imprint: Carcanet Poetry
Publisher: Carcanet Press
Available as:
Paperback (160 pages)
(Pub. Apr 2021)
9781800170896
£12.99 £11.69
eBook (EPUB) Needs ADE!
(Pub. Apr 2021)
9781800170902
£10.39 £9.35
eBook (Kindle)
(Pub. Apr 2021)
9781800170919
£10.39 £9.35
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  • Description
  • Author
  • Awards
  • Reviews
  • Martina Evans's eponymous Mules are shoes brought to her as an exotic gift by an American relation. They suggest to her the possibility of a very different world, one which the poems' speakers set out to explore.

    As happens often in her poems, new and invented experiences throw into relief Evans's own intensely lived experiences: the radiography units of hospitals and their merciless work culture, in which the speakers must survive; a London densely populated by human and animal characters whose colours and aspect she brilliantly evokes. And we revisit places her readers have encountered before, especially Burnfort, County Cork, with its bars and gossip and childhood complications, a subject of her lyrics.

    And, in the wake of the success of her 2018 book-length sequence, Now We Can Talk Openly About Men, she gives us a new long poem, 'Mountainy Men', which re-imagines family trauma through the prism of classic American cinema... American Mules is two books and two or more worlds in one. Evans's English makes different musics in the imagining of Ireland, England and America, but the same wise, wry, inventive mouth speaks them all.
    Martina Evans grew up in County Cork and trained in Dublin as a radiographer before moving to London in 1988. She is the author of twelve books poetry and prose. She has won several awards including the Premio Ciampi International Prize for Poetry in 2011. Now We Can Talk Openly About ... read more
    Awards won by Martina Evans Short-listed, 2019 Irish Times Poetry Now Award (Now We Can Talk Openly About Men) Short-listed, 2019 The Pigott Poetry Award (Now We Can Talk Openly About Men) Short-listed, 2019 The Roehampton Poetry Prize (Now We Can Talk Openly About Men) Short-listed, 2015 Irish Times Poetry Now Award (Burnfort, Las Vegas) Winner, 2011 Premio Ciampi Internazionale di Poesia (Ciampi International Poetry Prize) (Facing the Public)
    'Striking powers of social observation... every single adjective attentively exact... Without straining for effect, she mixes pity with horror - and a repeated theme of fallibility'

    Fiona Sampson, The Guardian

    'Her work is humane and funny, often beautiful, always without sentiment or bitterness... It is loose, chatty and free, awash with hospitals, cats and shoes. For Evans the joy of the given moment, the past's ever-present grief, the dreams of films and books, are frequencies overlapping at once... Evans is that rarest of rara avis, a poet whose work is at once serious and authentically enjoyable... American Mules is a book of splendours and will surely count among her very best.'

    Conor O'Callaghan, The Irish Times

    Praise for Martina Evans 'Terrifying tales of peace'

    Kate Clanchy, The Guardian

    'Evans's decision to occupy and represent these women in the midst of a period in Irish history which is at once surrounded by silence and overexposed in the long shadow it has cast, leaves us with a work which is compelling, subtle, compassionate and evocative.'

    Rosie Lavan, Poetry Ireland Review 

    'A sharply idiomatic reflection of the Irish revolution and Civil War... it is unputdownable'.
    Roy Foster, TLS Books of the Year 2018
     'Totally captivating.'
    Susan Jane Sims, Artemis Poetry
      '...a rich poetic contribution to our forthcoming interrogation of the War of independence, two intense and riveting dramatic monologues by women affected by the burning of Mallow in 1920, and the malaise of the new state in 1924.'
    Catriona Crowe, The Irish Times Best Books of 2018
        'Evans manages in this collection, like a great filmmaker or novelist, to gift the audience (and I use the word "audience" deliberately) with immersion into a world so real and complete we have to reluctantly drag ourselves back to our fictional lives.'
    Anne Tannam, The Dublin Review of Books

     'Full of insight and humour...Evan's ability to choose just the right word is unerring.'
    Suzanne O'Sullivan, The Observer
    'I loved everything about this book'
    Kate Kellaway, The Observer
     'Evans's ear for speech suits the monologue, and the monologues - talky, jumpy, Gothic - are intensely atmospheric, claustrophobic pieces... Here, and throughout, Evans catches the nightmarish powerlessness of living close to historical changes.'
    John McAuliffe, The Irish Times
     'Her ability to replicate on the page colloquial Irish rhythms and phrasing has been commented on before, and it draws the reader in from the beginning... Each poem is, in a sense, akin to a chapter of a novel, and there is narrative drive both within the poems and between them, but as they are poems, i.e. stand-alone entities and in this sense equally analogous to paintings, they serve as much as windows onto moments, thoughts, memories and feelings as narrative blocks.'
    Chris Edgoose, Wood Bee Poet

      'Evans' verse is tightly packed with images, but loose enough in its metre to read naturally. One can take the book at a running pace and enjoy a story with deep emotional beats, or slow the pace and reflect on the careful choice of wording.'
    Joe Darlington, Manchester Review of Books
      The admired vernacular brilliance of Martina Evans's poetry is applied here to her most ambitious work to date, bringing to vivid life one of the most terrible periods of Irish history from the Troubles around 1920 to the Civil War, as witnessed and experienced by two generations of women ... No other poet currently writing in Britain and Ireland can rival Evans's ability to represent the impact of the political on the personal without easy histrionics. This is a remarkable document, a major work.
    Bernard O'Donoghue
     'a subtle, challenging writer with a wonderfully destructive approach to the pieties she describes.'
    John McAuliffe, Irish Times
      'Evan's great skill is in knowing how much to put into a poem. She has a talent for selecting only the most resonant memories, for not over-icing the cake of sentiment. [...] Above all, Evans puts the right words in the right order, a dictum whose simple phrasing embodies its demands.'
    Michael Duggan, PN Review
    'These look like easy, anecdotal poems but they bite.'
    Alan Brownjohn, Sunday Times
     'A deceptively casual and enjoyable collection.'
    Irish Times
    'Martina Evans [is] brazenly humorous [...] with her dizzyingly wacky free-verse tale-telling.'
    The Tablet
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