Carcanet Press
Quote of the Day
Carcanet has always been the place to look for considerations of purely literary and intellectual merit. Its list relies on the vision and the faith and the energy of people who care about books, and values. It is thus as rare as it is invaluable.
Frederic Raphael

Andrew McNeillie

  • About
  • Biography
  • Reviews
  • Andrew McNeillie was born in North Wales and read English at Magdalen College, Oxford before becoming an editor and publisher. For many years he was literature editor at Oxford University Press. He has also held a chair in English at Exeter University where he is now Emeritus Professor. He is the founding editor of the magazine Archipelago and runs the Clutag Press. His memoir Once appeared in 2009 from Seren. His Carcanet poetry collections are Nevermore (Oxford Poets, 2000), Now, Then (2002), Slower (2006), In Mortal Memory (2010) and Winter Moorings (2014). His memoir, An Aran Keening, was published in 2001.


    Andrew McNeillie was born in North Wales in 1946 and read English at Magdalen
    College, Oxford. He is the Literature Editor at Oxford University Press. His
    collection of poems Nevermore (2000), in the Oxford Poets series from Carcanet, was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. His prose memoir An Aran Keening tells of his stay on Inis Mr, just short of a year through 1968-69 (Lilliput Press Ltd, Dublin, 2001/ University of Wisconsin Press, 2002). A new collection of poems Now, Then came out in 2002 from Oxford/Carcanet. His next collection is due from Carcanet in 2005.
     
    Praise for Andrew McNeillie 'A living poetic language flows, easy and slangy…the occasional poems which punctuate the later part of the collection are vitalized and  real, among them elegies that remember mourning his father’s death, and  other deaths, which ring true, urged into being by poetry itself.'
    Gillian Clarke
    'The  finest poems here are witty and elegiac, comforting and cajoling and speak of pervading human concerns with a rare lyrical ease and quiet authority. McNeillie’s special gift is for providing the pleasure that comes from recognition: we can see ourselves in his poems. The book carries an epigram from Wordsworth, and there is a Wordsworthian sense of audience and connection in this collection.'
    Times Literary Supplement
    'There is some extraordinary virtuosity here – in one poem, he finds 33 half-rhymes for 'envy'.
    John Greening, Country Life
Share this...
The Carcanet Blog PN Review 244: 'Perhaps only bad Poets become poets' read more Notes from the Dream House: 'The Shining' Review read more Judith Willson: Colour Standards read more Moser - PN Review read more Jane Draycott and Jenny Lewis: Recalibrating the Classics read more W.S Graham: Lives & Letters read more
Arts Council Logo
We thank the Arts Council England for their support and assistance in this interactive Project.
This website ©2000-2018 Carcanet Press Ltd