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David Kinloch

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  • David Kinloch was born, raised and educated in Glasgow. He is a graduate of the universities of Glasgow and Oxford and was for many years a teacher of French studies. He currently teaches creative writing and Scottish literature at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. His first collection of poems, entitled Paris-Forfar, was praised by Edwin Morgan in the Scotsman: 'The book is notable for three things: successes in the impossible genre of the prose-poem, ... a trio of lively flytings... and a series of moving elegies for a gay lover dead from AIDS.' Kinloch is the author of four previous collections including Un Tour d’Ecosse (2001) and In My Father’s House (2005), both published by Carcanet, and of many critical works in the fields of French, Translation and Scottish studies. In 2004 he was a winner of the Robert Louis Stevenson Memorial Award and in 2006 held a Scottish Writers’ Bursary from the Scottish Arts Council. He was a founder editor of the poetry magazine Verse and has been instrumental in setting up the first Scottish Writers’ Centre. His latest Carcanet collection, In Search of Dustie-Fute, was released in August 2017.

    Click here to read an interview with David Kinloch over on Mumble Words. Posted 01 September 2017.

    Click here to read a review of David Kinloch's new collection In Search of Dustie-Fute (2017) in The Herald. Posted 23 September 2017.
    'David Kinloch is one of the most innovative poets ever to come out of Scotland... his readers must be prepared to take a long voyage through language, imagination and space.'
    Douglas Messerli, Hyperallergic


    'Skill and vitality make this handsome publication a true and tender elegy for pleasures shared and love recalled.'
    Herald Scotland


    'A sparkling collection: full of sensuous richness and linguistic inventiveness. As the punning title of the book might suggest, there is much about fathers and sons, including the moving simplicity of a walk with a dead father 'and then/I let him go,/but this moment/which is far the hardest pain/remains'. But Kinloch unrolls a convincing set of unexpected scenarios: outspoken excerpts from Roger Casement's diaries intercut with the horrors of the Belgian oppression in Africa; tightly drawn translations of Celan into Scots; and a most impressive long poem,  'Baines His Dissection', where a medical man is seen embalming the body  of his friend and lover, against the background of a brilliantly evoked  Middle East of the seventeenth century.'
    Edwin Morgan
    Awards won by David Kinloch Short-listed, 2017 Saltire Society Poetry Book of the Year Award (In Search of Dustie-Fute) Commended, 2011 The Scotsman's Book of the Year (Finger of a Frenchman) Winner, 2004 Robert Louis Stevenson Memorial Award
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