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Kristín Ómarsdóttir

Kristín Ómarsdóttir
Books by this author:
  • About
  • Reviews
  • Kristín Ómarsdóttir (1962–) is the author of seven collections of poetry, five books of short stories, seven novels, and half a dozen plays. Her novels have been translated into many languages including Swedish, French, and English. Her awards include the DV Cultural Award for Literature, the Icelandic Women’s Literature Prize, and the Icelandic national prize for playwright of the year. She has been nominated for the Icelandic Literary Award four times, as well as the Nordic Council Literary Prize.
    Praise for Kristín Ómarsdóttir 'Waitress in Fall anthologizes the verse of Kristín Ómarsdóttir in English translation for the first time. As the book's translator, Valgerður deftly renders the lucid and often erotic lyricism of Ómarsdóttir's poetry into unpretentious, yet dignified English idiom, producing a volume that exhibits the poet's unique subjectivity and gestures towards universal impulses.'
    Eli Petzold, The Reykjavik Grapevine
    'A bracing, beautiful book... Ómarsdóttir excels at creating pleasurable tension. These poems are like "icecold milk", pure yet animal; invigorating to consume.'
    Clare Pollard
      'The world is so ready for the phantasmic heft of Kristín Ómarsdóttir. Her poems are transcribed dreams: too wet to be dirty, and absurdly funny - "in a lightless girlhole" - while deeply serious. Waitress in Fall does it all. Ómarsdóttir's poems are gigantically passionate, macabre, timely, glorious, and real.'
    Eileen Myles
     'It's a unique volume that presents the reader with a remarkable picture of a poet's career. Kristín's unmistakable voice escorts the reader from early leaps into middle-aged maturity, with lines that trip into one another, passing swiftly from lightness to despair and back again... As the poems drive the reader onward through the decades, passing haunting landscapes, surreal scenes of domestic life and shrines to the physicality of womanhood, there is a sense of rhythm and voice that carries throughout.'
    Björn Halldórsson, The Reykjavík Grapevine
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