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Valentine's Day Sale

Thursday, 8 Feb 2018

Valentine's Day Sale ''I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love."
Mr Darcy, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice


Get 25% off these selected titles in our Valentine's Day sale between 9th and 16th February



Let's love and drink and drink and love and drink on.
What have we else in this dull world to think on
But still to love, to drink and love and drink on?
Restoration Bawdy ed. by John Adlard


Poems, Songs and Jests on the Subject of Sensual Love is a lively social panorama of Restoration England and a cheerfully amoral celebration of the pleasures of the flesh.



Catullus, you’re a fool to bear such misery.
Just let her go, the girl who led you here. The sun
Was shining on you once, back then, when you were one
Who used to follow where she led you on.

Gaius Valerius Catullus' Carmina, translated by Len Krisak


Catullus' Carmina captures in English both the mordant, scathing wit and also the concise tenderness, the famous love for reluctant Lesbia who is made present in these new versions.



Lord, hear my prayer. This girl, this predator –
make her love me, or worth my love forever.
No, that’s too much to ask. Let her permit my love,
and that will be all I beg of sea-blown Venus.

Ovid's Amores, translated by Tom Bishop


A scandal in its day, and probably in part responsible for Ovid's banishment from Rome, Amores lays bare the intrigues and appetites of high society in the imperial capital at the time of Caesar Augustus. Clandestine sex, orgies and entertainments, fashion and violence, are among the subjects Ovid explores.



Scarcely had she descended out of Heaven
When first I saw her, and my soul was riven
To madness for her

Pierre De Ronsard' Cassandra, translated by Clive Lawrence

Ronsard's Cassandra is based on a real relationship with Cassandra Salviati. The sequence combines the poet’s love for an unattainable beauty with explorations of classical myth, the works of Homer and Ovid, and questions about the very nature of love, literary creation and human existence.































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