Carcanet Press
Quote of the Day
...where the usual publisher's list might be like the contents of a bookshop, Carcanet's was like the contents of a private library. More than that, over the years, the Carcanet list has grown without any dilution of seriousness, so that looking at it now is like being invited to read the contents of a poet's library.
Robert Nye

Poet on Poet of the Week on Sunday, 23 November 2014

John Keats

Andrew Motion

Keats died of tuberculosis in Rome on 23 February 1821, aged twenty-five. Two months later
Shelley began writing his famous elegy 'Adonais' (which was first printed in Pisa the following
June). Shelley's intention was to honour his dead friend, and to attack those - such as the
Tory Blackwood's Magazine and the Quarterly Review - whose 'savage criticism' of Endymion had
produced an 'agitation' which had led to Keats's 'rapid consumption'. It was a well-meant
defence. But it transformed Keats - who in life had been robust, convivial and radical - into
a beautiful weakling.

The first biography of Keats, which was published by Richard Monckton Milnes in 1848, tried to
correct Shelley's distortion - to little avail. Throughout the nineteenth century, as Keats's
reputation grew, he remained fixed in the popular imagination as 'the youngest of the martyrs'.
(The phrase is Oscar Wilde's.) Even in the 1960s, when three excellent biographies (by Walter
Jackson Bate, Robert Gittings, and Aileen Ward) finally filled in most of the details of Keats's
short life, the received image remained substantially the same. Keats had been blighted by the
world but had been separated from it by his devotion to 'the principle of Beauty'. He had
certainly not shown a developed interest in contemporary social affairs, or in politics.

Not true. Keats was born into a lower-middle-class family which was deeply aware of its social
insecurities, at a time of national and international crisis. He attended a school which, while
not being precisely a Dissenting Academy, shared many of the radical aims of such an
institution. During his training to be a doctor at Guy's, he was inspired by the progressive
aims of that great Whig institution. When he turned from medicine to poetry, he brought to his
writing the same ideals that had fed him in the early years of his life; he wanted to produce
poems which were 'physicianly', and which came down on 'the liberal side of the question'.

My selection from Keats's poems is designed to illustrate these neglected aspects of his genius,
as well as the much-praised sensuality of his work, of which it forms an important part.



On First Looking into Chapman's Homer

Much have I travelled in the realms of gold,
      And many goodly states and kingdoms seen;
      Round many western islands have I been
Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold.
Oft of one wide expanse had I been told
      That deep-browed Homer ruled as his demesne;
      Yet did I never breathe its pure serene
Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold:
Then felt I like some watcher of the skies
      When a new planet swims into his ken;
Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes
      He stared at the Pacific - and all his men
Looked at each other with a wild surmise -
      Silent, upon a peak in Darien.

*

Sleep and Poetry
 (lines 96-104; 122-32)

O for ten years, that I may overwhelm
Myself in poesy; so I may do the deed
That my own soul has to itself decreed.
Then will I pass the countries that I see
In long perspective, and continually
Taste their pure fountains. First the realm I'll pass
Of Flora, and old Pan: sleep in the grass,
Feed upon apples red, and strawberries,
And choose each pleasure that my fancy sees;

[...]

And can I ever bid these joys farewell?
Yes, I must pass them for a nobler life,
Where I may find the agonies, the strife
Of human hearts: for lo! I see afar,
O'ersailing the blue cragginess, a car
And steeds with streamy manes - the charioteer
Looks out upon the winds with glorious fear:
And now the numerous tramplings quiver lightly
Along a huge cloud's ridge; and now with sprightly
Wheel downward come they into fresher skies,
Tipped round with silver from the sun's bright eyes.

*

Endymion
Book I

(lines 1-33)

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its loveliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o'er-darkened ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old, and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
'Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
All lovely tales that we have heard or read:
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven's brink.

      Nor do we merely feel these essences
For one short hour; no, even as the trees
That whisper round a temple become soon
Dear as the temple's self, so does the moon,
The passion poesy, glories infinite,
Haunt us till they become a cheering light
Unto our souls, and bound to us so fast,
That, whether there be shine, or gloom o'ercast,
They alway must be with us, or we die.


Book III
(lines 1-40)

There are who lord it o'er their fellow-men
With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen
Their baaing vanities, to browse away
The comfortable green and juicy hay
From human pastures; or, O torturing fact!
Who, through an idiot blink, will see unpacked
Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe
Our gold and ripe-eared hopes. With not one tinge
Of sanctuary splendour, not a sight
Able to face an owl's, they still are dight
By the blear-eyed nations in empurpled vests,
And crowns, and turbans. With unladen breasts,
Save of blown self-applause, they proudly mount
To their spirit's perch, their being's high account,
Their tiptop nothings, their dull skies, their thrones -
Amid the fierce intoxicating tones
Of trumpets, shoutings, and belaboured drums,
And sudden cannon. Ah! how all his hums,
In wakeful ears, like uproar passed and gone -
Like thunder clouds that spake to Babylon,
And set those old Chaldeans to their tasks. -
Are then regalities all gilded masks?
No, there are thronèd seats unscalable
But by a patient wing, a constant spell,
Or by ethereal things that, unconfined,
Can make a ladder of the eternal wind,
And poise about in cloudy thunder-tents
To watch the abysm-birth of elements.
Aye, 'bove the withering of old-lipped Fate
A thousand Powers keep religious state,
In water, fiery realm, and airy bourne;
And, silent as a consecrated urn,
Hold sphery sessions for a season due.
Yet few of these far majesties, ah, few!
Have bared their operations to this globe -
Few, who with gorgeous pageantry enrobe
Our piece of heaven - whose benevolence
Shakes hand with our own Ceres; every sense
Filling with spiritual sweets to plenitude,
As bees gorge full their cells. [. . .]

*

To J. H. Reynolds, Esq.
 (lines 86-105)

      Dear Reynolds! I have a mysterious tale,
And cannot speak it: the first page I read
Upon a lampit rock of green sea-weed
Among the breakers; 'twas a quiet eve,
The rocks were silent, the wide sea did weave
An untumultuous fringe of silver foam
Along the flat brown sand; I was at home
And should have been most happy, - but I saw
Too far into the sea, where every maw
The greater on the less feeds evermore. -
But I saw too distinct into the core
Of an eternal fierce destruction,
And so from happiness I far was gone.
Still I am sick of it, and though, to-day,
I've gather'd young spring-leaves, and flowers gay
Of periwinkle and wild strawberry,
Still do I that most fierce destruction see, -
The shark at savage prey, - the hawk at pounce, -
The gentle robin, like a pard or ounce,
Ravening a worm, - Away, ye horrid moods!

*

Hyperion
Book I

(lines 164-200)

But one of the whole mammoth-brood still kept
His sovereignty, and rule, and majesty; -
Blazing Hyperion on his orbèd fire
Still sat, still snuffed the incense, teeming up
From man to the sun's God; yet unsecure:
For as among us mortals omens drear
Fright and perplex, so also shuddered he -
Not at dog's howl, or gloom-bird's hated screech,
Or the familiar visiting of one
Upon the first toll of his passing-bell,
Or prophesyings of the midnight lamp;
But horrors, portioned to a giant nerve,
Oft made Hyperion ache. His palace bright
Bastioned with pyramids of glowing gold,
And touched with shade of bronzèd obelisks,
Glared a blood-red through all its thousand courts,
Arches, and domes, and fiery galleries;
And all its curtains of Aurorian clouds
Flushed angerly: while sometimes eagle's wings,
Unseen before by Gods or wondering men,
Darkened the place; and neighing steeds were heard,
Not heard before by Gods or wondering men.
Also, when he would taste the spicy wreaths
Of incense, breathed aloft from sacred hills,
Instead of sweets, his ample palate took
Savour of poisonous brass and metal sick:
And so, when harboured in the sleepy west,
After the full completion of fair day, -
For rest divine upon exalted couch
And slumber in the arms of melody,
He paced away the pleasant hours of ease
With stride colossal, on from hall to hall;
While far within each aisle and deep recess,
His wingèd minions in close clusters stood,
Amazed and full of fear; like anxious men
Who on wide plains gather in panting troops,
When earthquakes jar their battlements and towers.

*

The Eve of St Agnes
 (lines 298-324)

xxxiv

      Her eyes were open, but she still beheld,
      Now wide awake, the vision of her sleep:
      There was a painful change, that nigh expelled
      The blisses of her dream so pure and deep
      At which fair Madeline began to weep,
      And moan forth witless words with many a sigh;
      While still her gaze on Porphyro would keep;
      Who knelt, with joinèd hands and piteous eye,
Fearing to move or speak, she looked so dreamingly.

xxxv

      'Ah, Porphyro!' said she, 'but even now
      Thy voice was at sweet tremble in mine ear,
      Made tuneable with every sweetest vow;
      And those sad eyes were spiritual and clear:
      How changed thou art! how pallid, chill, and drear!
      Give me that voice again, my Porphyro,
      Those looks immortal, those complainings dear!
      Oh leave me not in this eternal woe,
For if thou diest, my Love, I know not where to go.'

xxxvi

      Beyond a mortal man impassioned far
      At these voluptuous accents, he arose,
      Ethereal, flushed, and like a throbbing star
      Seen mid the sapphire heaven's deep repose;
      Into her dream he melted, as the rose
      Blendeth its odour with the violet, -
      Solution sweet: meantime the frost-wind blows
      Like Love's alarum pattering the sharp sleet
Against the window-panes: St Agnes' moon hath set.

*

La Belle Dame Sans Merci

A Ballad


i

Oh, what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
      Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has withered from the lake,
      And no birds sing.

ii

Oh, what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
      So haggard and so woe-begone?
The squirrel's granary is full,
      And the harvest's done.

iii

I see a lily on thy brow,
      With anguish moist and fever dew;
And on thy cheeks a fading rose
      Fast withereth too.

iv

I met a lady in the meads,
      Full beautiful - a faery's child,
Her hair was long, her foot was light,
      And her eyes were wild.

v

I made a garland for her head,
      And bracelets too, and fragrant zone;
She looked at me as she did love,
      And made sweet moan.

vi

I set her on my pacing steed,
      And nothing else saw all day long;
For sidelong would she bend, and sing
      A faery's song.

vii

She found me roots of relish sweet,
      And honey wild, and manna dew,
And sure in language strange she said -
      'I love thee true'.

viii

She took me to her elfin grot,
      And there she wept and sighed full sore,
And there I shut her wild wild eyes
      With kisses four.

ix

And there she lullèd me asleep
      And there I dreamed - Ah! woe betide!
The latest dream I ever dreamt
      On the cold hill side.

x

I saw pale kings and princes too,
      Pale warriors, death-pale were they all;
They cried - 'La Belle Dame sans Merci
      Hath thee in thrall!'

xi

I saw their starved lips in the gloam,
      With horrid warning gapèd wide,
And I awoke and found me here,
      On the cold hill's side.

xii

And this is why I sojourn here
      Alone and palely loitering,
Though the sedge has withered from the lake,
      And no birds sing.

*

Ode to Psyche

O Goddess! hear these tuneless numbers, wrung
      By sweet enforcement and remembrance dear,
And pardon that thy secrets should be sung
      Even into thine own soft-conchèd ear:
Surely I dreamt to-day, or did I see
      The wingèd Psyche with awakened eyes?
I wandered in a forest thoughtlessly,
      And, on the sudden, fainting with surprise,
Saw two fair creatures, couchèd side by side
      In deepest grass, beneath the whisp'ring roof
      Of leaves and trembled blossoms, where there ran
                        A brooklet, scarce espied:
'Mid hushed, cool-rooted flowers, fragrant-eyed,
      Blue, silver-white, and budded Tyrian,
They lay calm-breathing on the bedded grass;
      Their arms embraced, and their pinions too;
      Their lips touched not, but had not bade adieu,
As if disjoined by soft-handed slumber,
And ready still past kisses to outnumber
      (At tender eye-dawn of aurorean love:)
                        The wingèd boy I knew;
      But who wast thou, O happy, happy dove?
                        His Psyche true!

O latest born and loveliest vision far
      Of all Olympus' faded hierarchy!
Fairer than Phbe's sapphire-regioned star,
      Or Vesper, amorous glow-worm of the sky;
Fairer than these, though temple thou hast none,
                        Nor altar heaped with flowers;
Nor virgin-choir to make delicious moan
                        Upon the midnight hours;
No voice, no lute, no pipe, no incense sweet
      From chain-swung censer teeming;
No shrine, no grove, no oracle, no heat
      Of pale-mouthed prophet dreaming.

O brightest! thought too late for antique vows,
      Too, too late for the fond believing lyre,
When holy were the haunted forest boughs,
      Holy the air, the water, and the fire;
Yet even in these days so far retired
      From happy pieties, thy lucent fans,
      Fluttering among the faint Olympians,
I see, and sing, by my own eyes inspired.
So let me be thy choir, and make a moan
            Upon the midnight hours;
Thy voice, thy lute, thy pipe, thy incense sweet
      From swingèd censer teeming -
Thy shrine, thy grove, thy oracle, thy heat
      Of pale-mouthed prophet dreaming.

Yes, I will be thy priest, and build a fane
      In some untrodden region of my mind,
Where branchèd thoughts, new grown with pleasant pain,
      Instead of pines shall murmur in the wind:
Far, far around shall those dark-clustered trees
      Fledge the wild-ridgèd mountains steep by steep;
And there by zephyrs, streams, and birds, and bees,
      The moss-lain Dryads shall be lulled to sleep;
And in the midst of this wide quietness
      A rosy sanctuary will I dress
With the wreathed trellis of a working brain,
      With buds, and bells, and stars without a name,
With all the gardener Fancy e'er could feign,
      Who breeding flowers, will never breed the same:
And there shall be for thee all soft delight
      That shadowy thought can win,
A bright torch, and a casement ope at night,
      To let the warm Love in!

*

Ode on a Grecian Urn

i

Thou still unravished bride of quietness,
      Thou foster-child of silence and slow time,
Sylvan historian, who canst thus express
      A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme:
What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape
      Of deities or mortals, or of both,
            In Tempe or the dales of Arcady?
      What men or gods are these? What maidens loth?
What mad pursuit? What struggle to escape?
            What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?

ii

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard
      Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endeared,
      Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone:
Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave
      Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare;
            Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss,
Though winning near the goal - yet, do not grieve;
      She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss,
            For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!

iii

Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed
      Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu;
And, happy melodist, unwearièd,
      For ever piping songs for ever new;
More happy love! more happy, happy love!
      For ever warm and still to be enjoyed,
            For ever panting, and for ever young;
All breathing human passion far above,
      That leaves a heart high-sorrowful and cloyed,
            A burning forehead, and a parching tongue.

iv

Who are these coming to the sacrifice?
      To what green altar, O mysterious priest,
Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies,
      And all her silken flanks with garlands dressed?
What little town by river or sea shore,
      Or mountain-built with peaceful citadel,
            Is emptied of this folk, this pious morn?
And, little town, thy streets for evermore
      Will silent be; and not a soul to tell
            Why thou art desolate, can e'er return.

v

O Attic shape! Fair attitude! with brede
      Of marble men and maidens overwrought,
With forest branches and the trodden weed;
      Thou, silent form, dost tease us out of thought
As doth eternity: Cold Pastoral!
      When old age shall this generation waste,
            Thou shalt remain in midst of other woe
Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st,
      'Beauty is truth, truth beauty, - that is all
            Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.'

*

Ode to a Nightingale

i

My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains
      My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk
Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains
      One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk:
'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot,
      But being too happy in thine happiness, -
            That thou, light-wingèd Dryad of the trees,
                        In some melodious plot
      Of beechen green, and shadows numberless,
            Singest of summer in full-throated ease.

ii

O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been
      Cooled a long age in the deep-delvèd earth,
Tasting of Flora and the country green,
      Dance, and Provençal song, and sunburnt mirth!
O for a beaker full of the warm South,
      Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene,
            With beaded bubbles winking at the brim,
                        And purple-stainèd mouth;
      That I might drink, and leave the world unseen,
            And with thee fade away into the forest dim:

iii

Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget
      What thou among the leaves hast never known,
The weariness, the fever, and the fret
      Here, where men sit and hear each other groan;
Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs,
      Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and
            dies;
            Where but to think is to be full of sorrow
                        And leaden-eyed despairs,
            Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes,
                  Or new Love pine at them beyond to-
                        morrow.

iv

Away! away! for I will fly to thee,
      Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards,
But on the viewless wings of Poesy,
      Though the dull brain perplexes and retards:
Already with thee! tender is the night,
      And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne,
            Clustered around by all her starry Fays;
                        But here there is no light,
      Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown
            Through verdurous glooms and winding
                  mossy ways.

v

I cannot see what flowers are at my feet,
      Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs,
But, in embalmèd darkness, guess each sweet
      Wherewith the seasonable month endows
The grass, the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild;
      White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine;
            Fast fading violets covered up in leaves;
                        And mid-May's eldest child,
      The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine,
            The murmurous haunt of flies on summer
                  eves.

vi

Darkling I listen; and, for many a time
      I have been half in love with easeful Death,
Called him soft names in many a musèd rhyme,
      To take into the air my quiet breath;
Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
      To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
            While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
                        In such an ecstasy!
      Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain -
            To thy high requiem become a sod.

vii

Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird!
      No hungry generations tread thee down;
The voice I hear this passing night was heard
      In ancient days by emperor and clown:
Perhaps the self-same song that found a path
      Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for
            home,
            She stood in tears amid the alien corn;
                        The same that oft-times hath
      Charmed magic casements, opening on the foam
            Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.

viii

Forlorn! the very word is like a bell
      To toll me back from thee to my sole self!
Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well
      As she is famed to do, deceiving elf.
Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades
      Past the near meadows, over the still stream,
            Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep
                        In the next valley-glades:
      Was it a vision, or a waking dream?
            Fled is that music: - Do I wake or sleep?

*

Lamia
Part I

(lines 47-67)

      She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue,
Vermilion-spotted, golden, green, and blue;
Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard,
Eyed like a peacock, and all crimson barred;
And full of silver moons, that, as she breathed,
Dissolv'd, or brighter shone, or interwreathed
Their lustres with the gloomier tapestries -
So rainbow-sided, touched with miseries,
She seemed, at once, some penanced lady elf,
Some demon's mistress, or the demon's self.
Upon her crest she wore a wannish fire
Sprinkled with stars, like Ariadne's tiar:
Her head was serpent, but ah, bitter-sweet!
She had a woman's mouth with all its pearls complete:
And for her eyes: what could such eyes do there
But weep, and weep, that they were born so fair?
As Proserpine still weeps for her Sicilian air.
Her throat was serpent, but the words she spake
Came, as through bubbling honey, for Love's sake,
And thus; while Hermes on his pinions lay,
Like a stooped falcon ere he takes his prey.

*

To Autumn

i

Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness,
      Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun;
Conspiring with him how to load and bless
      With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves
            run;
To bend with apples the mossed cottage-trees,
      And fill all fruit with ripeness to the core;
            To swell the gourd, and plump the hazel
                  shells
      With a sweet kernel; to set budding more,
And still more, later flowers for the bees,
Until they think warm days will never cease,
            For Summer has o'er-brimmed their clammy
                  cells.

ii

Who hath not seen thee oft amid thy store?
      Sometimes whoever seeks abroad may find
Thee sitting careless on a granary floor,
      Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind;
Or on a half-reaped furrow sound asleep,
      Drowsed with the fume of poppies, while thy
            hook
            Spares the next swath and all its twinèd
                  flowers:
And sometimes like a gleaner thou dost keep
      Steady thy laden head across a brook;
      Or by a cider-press, with patient look,
            Thou watchest the last oozings hours by
                  hours.

iii

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
      Think not of them, thou hast thy music too, -
While barrèd clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
      And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue;
Then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn
      Among the river sallows, borne aloft
            Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies;
And full-grown lambs loud bleat from hilly bourn;
      Hedge-crickets sing; and now with treble soft
      The red-breast whistles from a garden-croft;
            And gathering swallows twitter in the skies.

*

The Fall of Hyperion
A Dream


[Canto I]
 (lines 1-18; 237-71)

Fanatics have their dreams, wherewith they weave
A paradise for a sect; the savage too
From forth the loftiest fashion of his sleep
Guesses at Heaven; pity these have not
Traced upon vellum or wild Indian leaf
The shadows of melodious utterance.
But bare of laurel they live, dream, and die;
For Poesy alone can tell her dreams,
With the fine spell of words alone can save
Imagination from the sable charm
And dumb enchantment. Who alive can say,
'Thou art no Poet - may'st not tell thy dreams'?
Since every man whose soul is not a clod
Hath visions, and would speak, if he had loved,
And been well nurtured in his mother tongue.
Whether the dream now purposed to rehearse
Be poet's or fanatic's will be known
When this warm scribe my hand is in the grave.

[...]

I looked upon the altar, and its horns
Whitened with ashes, and its languorous flame,
And then upon the offerings again;
And so by turns - till sad Moneta cried,
'The sacrifice is done, but not the less
Will I be kind to thee for thy good will.
My power, which to me is still a curse,
Shall be to thee a wonder; for the scenes
Still swooning vivid through my globèd brain,
With an electral changing misery,
Thou shalt with those dull mortal eyes behold,
Free from all pain, if wonder pain thee not.'
As near as an immortal's spherèd words
Could to a mother's soften, were these last:
And yet I had a terror of her robes,
And chiefly of the veils, that from her brow
Hung pale, and curtained her in mysteries,
That made my heart too small to hold its blood.
This saw that Goddess, and with sacred hand
Parted the veils. Then saw I a wan face,
Not pined by human sorrows, but bright-blanched
By an immortal sickness which kills not;
It works a constant change, which happy death
Can put no end to; deathwards progressing
To no death was that visage; it had passed
The lily and the snow; and beyond these
I must not think now, though I saw that face -
But for her eyes I should have fled away.
They held me back, with a benignant light,
Soft mitigated by divinest lids
Half-closed, and visionless entire they seemed
Of all external things; - they saw me not,
But in blank splendour, beamed like the mild moon,
Who comforts those she sees not, who knows not
What eyes are upward cast. [. . .]

*

'Bright star'

Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art -
      Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
      Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
      Of pure ablution round earth's human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
      Of snow upon the mountains and the moors -
No - yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
      Pillowed upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
      Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever - or else swoon to death.

*

'This living hand'

This living hand, now warm and capable
Of earnest grasping, would, if it were cold
And in the icy silence of the tomb,
So haunt thy days and chill thy dreaming nights
That thou wouldst wish thine own heart dry of blood
So in my veins red life might stream again,
And thou be conscience-calmed - see here it is -
I hold it towards you.
Taken from 'Poets on Poets'...
Share this...
The Carcanet Blog A Natural Hybrid by Karen McCarthy Woolf read more News from Niue with John Gallas read more A Short Note on a Painted Violin by Greg O'Brien read more The Carcanet Blog Halloween Special read more Louise Gluck's 'Faithful and Virtuous Night' on the TS Eliot Prize shortlist! read more A Portrait for America: An Anti-Monumental Monument by David C. Ward read more
Arts Council Logo
We thank the Arts Council England for their support and assistance in this interactive Project.
This website ©2000-2014 Carcanet Press Ltd