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Oxford Poets 2000

An Anthology

Edited by David Constantine, Hermione Lee and Bernard O'Donoghue

Cover Picture of Oxford Poets Anthology 2000
RRP: GBP£ 9.95
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Price: GBP£ 8.96
Out of Print
Paperback
ISBN: 978 1 903039 03 8
Categories: Anthologies
Imprint: OxfordPoets
Published: November 2000
216 x 135 x 9 mm
220 pages
Publisher: Carcanet Press
  • Description
  • Excerpt
  • Editors
  • Awards
  • Reviews
  • Including poetry by:

    Stephanie Norgate
    Joe Sheerin
    Jenny Lewis
    Rebecca Elson
    Tim Kendall
    Sue Hubbard
    OxfordPoets 2000 is the first OxfordPoets anthology, introducing the work of six writers whose poems extend the rich tradition of the Oxford list under the aegis of Carcanet, in association with the English Faculty, Oxford. The OxfordPoets editorial panel makes the selection, acknowledging promise and achievement. There is no editorial programme or ideology beyond a desire to represent the best. Drawing on a wealth of submitted manuscript material the editors choose what they find most compelling in terms of formal and rhythmic invention. Verse metered or unmetered, rhymed or unrhyming, with sure or fragmented syntax, makes specific claims. The poem, not the poet, answers.

    The work of Rebecca Elson is complete: she died in 1999 at the age of 39, and her journal, source of the work included here, is currently being transcribed.

    The editors are members of the OxfordPoets board.


    Bernard O'Donoghue
    , born in Co. Cork in 1945, teaches Mediaeval English at Wadham College, Oxford and has published four books of poems of which the most recent was Here Nor There (Chatto, 1999).


    Hermione Lee
    , Goldsmiths' Professor of English Literature at Oxford University, is author of Virginia Woolf (1996) and other biographical and critical works.


    David Constantine
    teaches German Literature at Oxford and is a poet and translator. His most recent collection was The Pelt of Wasps (Bloodaxe).
    David Constantine
    David Constantine is a novelist, poet and translator of Hoelderlin, Goethe, Faust and Brecht. He is also an editor of Oxford Poets, an imprint of Carcanet Press, and of the magazine Modern Poetry in Translation . Born in Salford, Lancashire, in 1944, he is a Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford, ... read more
    Hermione Lee
    Hermione Lee, Goldsmiths' Professor of English Literature at Oxford and Fellow of New College, is the author of Viginia Woolf (1996) and other biographical and critical works. ... read more
    Bernard O'Donoghue
    Bernard O'Donoghue teaches Medieval English at Wadham College, Oxford,and has published seven books of poems, including Gunpowder, which won the Whitbread Prize for Poetry in 1995, and his Selected Poems (Faber, 2008). His verse translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight was published by Penguin Classics in 2006. ... read more
    Awards won by David Constantine Short-listed, 2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award (The Shieling) Winner, 2013 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Prize
    (Tea at the Midland)
    Winner, 2010 BBC National Short Story Award
    (Tea at the Midland)
    Praise for David Constantine 'I started reading these stories quietly, and then became obsessed, read them all fast, and started re-reading them again and again. They are gripping tales, but what is startling is the quality of the writing. Every sentence is both unpredictable and exactly what it should be. Reading them is a series of short shocks of (agreeably envious) pleasure...'
    AS Byatt, Book of the Week, The Guardian
    'Flawless and unsettling.'
    Boyd Tonkin, Books of the Year 2005, The Independent
    'Touched at times with humour and infused with compassion, these complex, nuanced stories speak repeatedly of lives lived in some form of exile, yet manage to keep in play the possibility that exile is not, contrary to appearances, our true condition.'
    New Welsh Review
    'A. S. Byatt has described reading a previous collection of Constantine's short fiction as akin to experiencing ''a series of short shocks of (agreeably envious) pleasure''. Tea at the Midland shows the author to be on equally sparkling form again.'
    The TLS
    'The excellence of the collection is fractal: the whole book is excellent, and every story is excellent, and every paragraph is excellent, and every sentence is excellent. And, unlike some literary fiction, it's effortless to read.'
    The Independent on Sunday
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