Carcanet Press
Quote of the Day
Devotedly, unostentatiously, Carcanet has evolved into a poetry publisher whose independence of mind and largeness of heart have made everyone who cares about literature feel increasingly admiring and grateful.
Andrew Motion

The Met Office Advises Caution

Rebecca Watts

The Met Office Advises Caution
RRP: GBP£ 9.99
Discount: 10%
You Save: GBP£ 1.00

Price: GBP£ 8.99
Available Add to basket
This title is available for academic inspection (paperback only).
Paperback
ISBN: 978 1 784102 72 2
Categories: 21st Century, British, First Collections, Humour, Women
Imprint: Carcanet Poetry
Published: September 2016
216 x 138 mm
72 pages
Publisher: Carcanet Press
Also available in: eBook (Kindle), eBook (PDF), eBook (EPUB)
Digital access available through Exact Editions
  • Description
  • Excerpt
  • Author
  • Awards
  • Reviews
  • ‘Below the tree
    free-riding on the water
    a shadow plays,
    beguiling,
    ripe for idolatry.

    I believe the tree
    and note it down as the answer
    to its own question.’
     Shortlisted for The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry First Collection Prize 2017

    Rebecca Watts’s debut collection is a witty, warm-hearted guide to the English landscape, and a fresh take on nature poetry. In assured style, Watts positions herself where Wordsworth, Frost and Hughes have stood; with an original point of view and an openness to the possibilities of form, she retunes the genre for modern ears.

    From the wide-open plains of ecology and social history to the intimate enclosures of dreams, homes and bodies, these poems approach their often-unusual subjects with the clarity and matter-of-factness of Simon Armitage and with humour that recalls Stevie Smith, spinning memorable scenes and vivid images from the material of ordinary language.

    Animals, as familiars and omens, abound. Weather anticipates and directs human drama, under the analytic and tender watch of a poet influenced as much by science and realism as by Romanticism. As landscaper, orienteer and companion, Watts finds new ways of negotiating the complex territories of our physical and emotional worlds.

    Rebecca Watts was born in Suffolk in 1983 and currently lives in Cambridge, where she works in a library and as a freelance editor. A selection of her poetry was included in New Poetries VI (2015). Her debut collection The Met Office Advises Caution (2016) is a Poetry Book Society Recommendation ... read more
    Awards won by Rebecca Watts Short-listed, 2017 The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry First Collection Prize (The Met Office Advises Caution )
    'The title poem gently alerts us to the shared vulnerability of man, creature and environment. Brief encounters and deep connections with animals are perceptively drawn€“ while the weaker links between people are pinpointed with needle-sharp satire.'
    Financial Times Best Books of 2016
    'The Met Office Advises Caution is, without doubt, a deft take on nature poetry, but we would be remiss to read it simply as that. Watts has not only begun reworking the tradition for the present era, but has also started to fill it with a life and range that helps us make new sense of the past.'
    The London Magazine
     'Well edited, deceptively simple, quietly shrewd. [A] truly lovely group of articulate, intelligible, clean, clear-sighted poems, which despite their unassuming exteriors, belie the scuttle of enigmatic presences beneath.'
    Will Barrett, The Poetry School Books of the Year 2016
       'Humour, philosophy, feminism and the natural world might not necessarily make for comfortable poetry bedfellows, but [Watts] has them fitting together perfectly. The contents of wheelie bins, Zen trees, a suffragette audaciously mounting a penny farthing bicycle, athletic tracks and the fate of country moles - the poems offer levity and depth, always revealing a ''clear hard road, made for going along''€.'
    Sarah Hall, Guardian Best Books of 2016
    'Rebecca Watts'€™s poems adopt strange and illuminating vantage points - the bird'€™s-eye view of a hawk, or a Victorian lady surveying a street from a penny-farthing - to do poetry'€™s work of telling the truth, but telling it slant. Watts is particularly attuned to those points where human and non-human creatures meet and interact, and writes with intelligence and incision.'
    Emma Jones
Share this...
The Carcanet Blog How we found the Kingdom of Children read more I'll See Myself Out read more Naked Fates read more In an Earlier Aftermath read more 'That you will not betray me' read more Every Day is World Poetry Day read more
Arts Council Logo
We thank the Arts Council England for their support and assistance in this interactive Project.
This website ©2000-2017 Carcanet Press Ltd